ARTIST STATEMENT

Myth is my vehicle for spirituality. My own process is very similar to the myths I draw from: I start with a sort of vague idea of where I want to take things, but as the work and the series progress, the directions and destination become clearer. This is one of the reasons why I like the process so much. The process of making sculpture is a spiritual practice for me. The idea of myth is a narrative form. I believe we all have some type of myth running through our veins. Myths are stories about people and myths help us see ourselves within journeys, within narratives and going through things that so many others have gone through before us. By giving us a way to guide ourselves, myths strengthen us and help us find direction. Myths help us find spiritual footing and make the point that, because of culture, we are never truly alone.

ABOUT ME

Joseph L. Castle, III

I was raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania were I had the pleasure of having the Barnes Collection, Rodin museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum in my backyard. These along with other art venues throughout the city afforded me the opportunity to view the art process. In 1977 I went west for the first time and was drawn to the land and space. It was then I wanted to be an artist. My journal became photographs. With an instamatic, I documented my western experience.

On that year’s birthday, I was given a 35mm and became inspired by black and white images specifically the works of the life magazine photographers Imogen Cunningham, Minor White, Dorothy Lang Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Henri Cartier Bresson. As my artistic expression grew I took painting and drawing classes, but photos were my primary focus.

After graduating from the University of Colorado I taught outdoor education, but still wanted to pursue art and moved to California to attend Brooks Institute of Photography. It was there that I became familiar with the 4x5 camera and started my photographic pursuits with large format images. I wanted to pursue my fine art further and because of that I left Brooks and moved to Allentown, Pennsylvania and enrolled into the Barnstone Studio.

Myron Barnstone ran the Barnstone Studio and his approach was simple: learn classically. He made art a logical systematic endeavor to be perused with vigor. His methods and teaching style were demanding and because of that my eye and language for my craft became acutely sensitive. It was also from this practice that my eye became drawn to sculpture.

My own process is very similar to the myths I draw from: I start with a sort of vague idea of where I want to take things, but as the work and the series progress, the directions and destination become clearer. This is one of the reasons why I like the process so much. The process of making sculpture is a spiritual practice for me. The idea of myth is a narrative form. I believe we all have some type of myth running through our veins. Myths are stories about people and myths help us see ourselves within journeys, within narratives and going through things that so many others have gone through before us. By giving us a way to guide ourselves, myths strengthen us and help us find direction. Myths help us find spiritual footing and make the point that, because of culture, we are never truly alone.